Russian Lacquer Box

Russian HAND PAINTED LACQUER trinket Box Alice in Wonderland Caterpillar signed


Russian HAND PAINTED LACQUER trinket Box Alice in Wonderland Caterpillar signed
Russian HAND PAINTED LACQUER trinket Box Alice in Wonderland Caterpillar signed
Russian HAND PAINTED LACQUER trinket Box Alice in Wonderland Caterpillar signed
Russian HAND PAINTED LACQUER trinket Box Alice in Wonderland Caterpillar signed
Russian HAND PAINTED LACQUER trinket Box Alice in Wonderland Caterpillar signed
Russian HAND PAINTED LACQUER trinket Box Alice in Wonderland Caterpillar signed
Russian HAND PAINTED LACQUER trinket Box Alice in Wonderland Caterpillar signed
Russian HAND PAINTED LACQUER trinket Box Alice in Wonderland Caterpillar signed

Russian HAND PAINTED LACQUER trinket Box Alice in Wonderland Caterpillar signed   Russian HAND PAINTED LACQUER trinket Box Alice in Wonderland Caterpillar signed

This is a beautiful and unique Russian SHELL PAPER and papier mache trinket/jewellery box portraying Alice and the Caterpillar, hand painted. The box is signed with the artists name S. And depicts Alice in Wonderland (Advice from a Caterpillar). This is a fabulous oil painted picture and the photo dosen't do it justice. I also have more Boxs from this artist in my shop.

The Caterpillar and Alice looked at each other for some time in silence: at last the Caterpillar took the hookah out of its mouth, and addressed her in a languid, sleepy voice. This was not an encouraging opening for a conversation. Alice replied, rather shyly, I--I hardly know, sir, just at present-- at least I know who I WAS when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then.

What do you mean by that? I can't explain MYSELF, I'm afraid, sir said Alice, because I'm not myself, you see. I don't see, said the Caterpillar.

I'm afraid I can't put it more clearly, Alice replied very politely, for I can't understand it myself to begin with; and being so many different sizes in a day is very confusing. It isn't, said the Caterpillar. Well, perhaps you haven't found it so yet, said Alice; but when you have to turn into a chrysalis--you will some day, you know--and then after that into a butterfly, I should think you'll feel it a little queer, won't you? Not a bit, said the Caterpillar. Well, perhaps your feelings may be different, said Alice; all I know is, it would feel very queer to ME. Which brought them back again to the beginning of the conversation. Alice felt a little irritated at the Caterpillar's making such VERY short remarks, and she drew herself up and said, very gravely, I think, you ought to tell me who YOU are, first.

Here was another puzzling question; and as Alice could not think of any good reason, and as the Caterpillar seemed to be in a VERY unpleasant state of mind, she turned away. The Caterpillar called after her. I've something important to say! This sounded promising, certainly: Alice turned and came back again. Keep your temper, said the Caterpillar.

Said Alice, swallowing down her anger as well as she could. Alice thought she might as well wait, as she had nothing else to do, and perhaps after all it might tell her something worth hearing.

For some minutes it puffed away without speaking, but at last it unfolded its arms, took the hookah out of its mouth again, and said, So you think you're changed, do you? Can't remember WHAT things? Well, I've tried to say "HOW DOTH THE LITTLE BUSY BEE, " but it all came different! Alice replied in a very melancholy voice. Repeat, "YOU ARE OLD, FATHER WILLIAM, " said the Caterpillar.

Alice folded her hands, and began. You are old, Father William, the young man said, And your hair has become very white; And yet you incessantly stand on your head-- Do you think, at your age, it is right? In my youth, Father William replied to his son, I feared it might injure the brain; But, now that I'm perfectly sure I have none, Why, I do it again and again. You are old, said the youth, as I mentioned before, And have grown most uncommonly fat; Yet you turned a back-somersault in at the door-- Pray, what is the reason of that? In my youth, said the sage, as he shook his grey locks, I kept all my limbs very supple By the use of this ointment--one shilling the box-- Allow me to sell you a couple? You are old, said the youth, and your jaws are too weak For anything tougher than suet; Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak-- Pray how did you manage to do it? In my youth, said his father, I took to the law, And argued each case with my wife; And the muscular strength, which it gave to my jaw, Has lasted the rest of my life. You are old, said the youth, one would hardly suppose That your eye was as steady as ever; Yet you balanced an eel on the end of your nose-- What made you so awfully clever? I have answered three questions, and that is enough, Said his father; don't give yourself airs! Do you think I can listen all day to such stuff? Be off, or I'll kick you down stairs! That is not said right, said the Caterpillar. Not QUITE right, I'm afraid, said Alice, timidly; some of the words have got altered.

It is wrong from beginning to end, said the Caterpillar decidedly, and there was silence for some minutes. The Caterpillar was the first to speak. What size do you want to be? Oh, I'm not particular as to size, Alice hastily replied; only one doesn't like changing so often, you know. I DON'T know, said the Caterpillar.

Alice said nothing: she had never been so much contradicted in her life before, and she felt that she was losing her temper. Well, I should like to be a LITTLE larger, sir, if you wouldn't mind, said Alice: three inches is such a wretched height to be. It is a very good height indeed! Said the Caterpillar angrily, rearing itself upright as it spoke (it was exactly three inches high).

But I'm not used to it! Pleaded poor Alice in a piteous tone. And she thought of herself, I wish the creatures wouldn't be so easily offended! You'll get used to it in time, said the Caterpillar; and it put the hookah into its mouth and began smoking again. This time Alice waited patiently until it chose to speak again. In a minute or two the Caterpillar took the hookah out of its mouth and yawned once or twice, and shook itself. Then it got down off the mushroom, and crawled away in the grass, merely remarking as it went, One side will make you grow taller, and the other side will make you grow shorter. The other side of WHAT?

Of the mushroom, said the Caterpillar, just as if she had asked it aloud; and in another moment it was out of sight...................... Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) is a novel written by. Author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym. It tells the story of a girl named Alice who falls down a.

Into a fantasy world populated by peculiar and. The tale is filled with allusions to Dodgson's friends (and enemies), and to the lessons that British schoolchildren were expected to memorize. In ways that have given the story lasting popularity to adults as well as children. It is considered to be one of the most characteristic examples of the genre of. Course and structure has been enormously influential, mainly in the fantasy genre.

The book is commonly referred to by the abbreviated title Alice in Wonderland , an alternative title popularized by the numerous stage, film and television adaptations of the story produced over the years. Some printings of this title contain both Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel. Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There. Alice was written in 1865, exactly three years after the Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson and the Reverend.

Rowed in a boat up the. Lorina Charlotte Liddell (aged 13) ("Prima" in the book's prefatory verse).

(aged 10) ("Secunda" in the prefatory verse). Edith Mary Liddell (aged 8) ("Tertia" in the prefatory verse). The three girls were the daughters of. The Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University and Dean of Christ Church as well as headmaster of Westminster School. Most of the book's adventures were based on and influenced by people, situations and buildings in Oxford, England and at Christ Church, e.

The "Rabbit Hole" which symbolized the actual stairs in the back of the main hall in Christ Church. The journey had started at. And ended five miles away in the village of.

To while away time the Reverend Dodgson told the girls a story that, not so coincidentally, featured a bored little girl named Alice who goes looking for an adventure. The girls loved it, and Alice Liddell asked Dodgson to write it down for her. After a lengthy delay over two years he eventually did so and on 26 November 1864 gave Alice the handwritten manuscript of Alice's Adventures Under Ground, with illustrations by Dodgson himself. Speculate there was an earlier version that was destroyed later by Dodgson himself when he printed a more elaborate copy by hand (Gardner, 1965), but there is no known prima facie evidence to support this. The boxes most widely sought after come from one of four small Russian villages - Palekh, Fedoskino, Kholui, and Mstera.

Special schools have been established at these places where artists train for four years before they become members of each village's art community. Each village also has its unique style. Or better yet Be sure to add me to your. And see more unique and interesting things pop up.

We speak French , English , German and Russian. Please leave feedback once you have recived the item so that i know it has arrived safely. I will leave feedback in return.

Smoke & Pet Free Item. The item "Russian HAND PAINTED LACQUER trinket Box Alice in Wonderland Caterpillar signed" is in sale since Monday, July 20, 2015.

This item is in the category "Collectables\Decorative Ornaments & Plates\Boxes & Trinkets". The seller is "tom3burma" and is located in Norwich.

This item can be shipped worldwide.

  1. Type: Boxes/ Trinkets
  2. Subtype: Shell paper Lacquer Box
  3. Country/Region of Manufacture: Russian Federation


Russian HAND PAINTED LACQUER trinket Box Alice in Wonderland Caterpillar signed   Russian HAND PAINTED LACQUER trinket Box Alice in Wonderland Caterpillar signed